SMS

Research Methods Community:
2022 Doctoral Student and Junior Faculty Consortium

April 29, May 6, and May 20 from 9:00 AM-11:00AM EDT (UTC -4) on Zoom Meetings 
2022 SMS membership required  

Organizers

picture of Brent Goldfarb
Brent Goldfarb
University of Maryland
picture of Sarah Wolfolds
Sarah Wolfolds
Cornell University

The Research Methods Community will offer a Doctoral Student and Junior Faculty Consortium in the Spring of 2022 on April 29, May 6, and May 20 from 9:00 AM - 11:00AM EDT (UTC -4). The Consortium will take place virtually over Zoom Meetings.  All student and junior faculty (within three years of graduation) that are current 2022 members of the Strategic Management Society are invited to participate.

The purpose of this consortium is to provide students and junior faculty with a learning opportunity to focus on research design and empirical approaches. Panelists for the consortium will be leading scholars in research methods from across the SMS community. The topics for these sessions will be 

April 29, 2022 - RMC Doctoral and Junior Faculty Consortium: Session 1

Using Directed Acyclical Graphs to Clarify Control Variables and Identification; Topic Modeling: Rendering New Theory from Textual Data

The 2022 SMS Research Methods Interest Group Doctoral and Junior Faculty Consortium will take place over three sessions. In this first session, two presentations will be shown.

The first will be from Paul Hünermund of Copenhagen Business School, who will present on "Using Directed Acyclical Graphs (DAGs) to clarify Control Variables and Identification." DAGs are a powerful tool to clarify threats to identification as well as when controls are good or when they are “bad”, and should be in any empirical researcher’s toolkit.

The second will be from Richard Haans of the Rotterdam School of Management, who will present on "Topic Modeling: Rendering New Theory from Textual Data." Topic modeling has been increasingly used to analyze textual data. These methods can enable scholars to develop better understandings of strategic decisions.

Both speakers have provided reading materials ahead of the webinar and reading them ahead of time is highly recommended:

DAGs:
Hünermund, Paul, and Elias Bareinboim. 2019. “Causal Inference and Data Fusion in Econometrics.” arXiv [econ.EM]. arXiv. http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.09104.
Hünermund, Paul, and Beyers Louw. 2020. “On the Nuisance of Control Variables in Regression Analysis.” arXiv [econ.EM]. arXiv. http://arxiv.org/abs/2005.10314

Topic Modeling:
Hannigan, T. R., Haans, R. F., Vakili, K., Tchalian, H., Glaser, V. L., Wang, M. S., ... & Jennings, P. D. (2019). Topic modeling in management research: Rendering new theory from textual data. Academy of Management Annals, 13(2), 586-632. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1KicA9UqmjRhPjczhM2ejnAS7Vy1zj1sJ/view?usp=sharing

May 6, 2022 - RMC Doctoral and Junior Faculty Consortium: Session 2

Reporting and Abduction: Taking the Hack Out of the P - How to Future-proof Your Reporting

In this second session, Brent Goldfarb (University of Maryland), Andrew King (Boston University), and Sandeep Pillai (Bocconi University) discuss how current reporting norms fail to take into account fundamental assumptions of frequentist statistics. They review new methods of reporting that take into account the challenges of archival and experimental data analysis. They discuss the limitations of pre-registration and replication in strategic management research and discuss potential solutions including abduction/Inference to the best explanation using historical methods to complement statistical methods and epistemic mapping.

The speakers have provided reading materials ahead of the webinar and reading them ahead of time is highly recommended:

King, Andrew, Brent Goldfarb, and Timothy Simcoe. 2021. “Learning from Testimony on Quantitative Research in Management.” AMR 46 (3): 465–88. https://paperpile.com/shared/Iuh9qs

King, A., and L. Berchicci. 2021. “Mapping the Garden of Forking Paths: The Case of Social & Financial Performance.” Strategic Management Journal. https://open.bu.edu/handle/2144/42829.

Pillai, S. D., B. Goldfarb, and D. Kirsch. 2021. “Using Historical Methods to Improve Abduction and Inference to the Best Explanation in Strategy.” https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Shared%20Documents/conferences/strategy-science-2021/80_Pillai%20et%20al%202021%20-%20History.pdf.

May 20, 2022 - RMC Doctoral and Junior Faculty Consortium: Session 3

New Methods for Endogeneity

The 2022 SMS Research Methods Interest Group Doctoral and Junior Faculty Consortium will take place over three sessions.

In this third session, Evan Starr (University of Maryland), Chris Rider (University of Michigan), and Sarah Wolfolds (Cornell) discuss how the credibility revolution in strategy emphasizes the importance of research design in answering causal questions. They describe methods to assess the sensitivity of estimates to violations of identifying assumptions in instrumental variables, differences in differences, and potential omitted variables.

The speakers have provided reading materials ahead of the webinar and reading them ahead of time is highly recommended:

Cinelli, C., & Hazlett, C. (2020). Making sense of sensitivity: Extending omitted variable bias. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series B (Statistical Methodology), 82(1), 39-67.
Conley, Timothy G., Christian B. Hansen, and Peter E. Rossi. 2010. “Plausibly Exogenous.” The Review of Economics and Statistics. https://doi.org/10.1162/REST_a_00139.
van Kippersluis, H., & Rietveld, C. A. (2018). Beyond plausibly exogenous. The Econometrics Journal, 21(3), 316-331.